Giampaolo Talani

January 25, 2014 § 1 Comment

Today I would like to bring attention to an Italian artist that has his work on a variety of surfaces in many different towns in this country.  I mentioned him a while ago, when I checked out his exhibition in Como, and now it’s time to elaborate a little bit.

Tre donne sul muro

Giampaolo Talani was born in San Vicenzo in 1955.  He studied art at the accademia di Belle Arti in Florence, and since then has produced notable works in all types of media: from sculpture to prints, from paintings to frescos, and more.

Pontassieve

And while Talani’s art has a variety of outlets, the style is easy to recognize: bold, stylized, exaggerated, undiluted.  And there are a few characters that repeat themselves: the sailor, the departed, the man who has crossed the ocean, the fisherman.

In fact, the water’s edge and the idea of movement/transition/time plays a large part in Talain’s art, and is most frequently reflected in his depiction of water and the space around it.  As well as in the figures, which always hold center stage, captured in a snapshot of a simple life, a simple time.  Throw in the references to Tuscan culture, and you might be able to begin to describe what this artist works with.

Another subject that is near and dear to Talain is the musician.  Yet even this has a murk of the past in it, as usually the figures resonate more silence than music.  Which makes sense, seeing as the artist wishes to paint the musician that is not a musician- the musician that could have been, or was, but is no more, because life became too busy to leave time for music.

If you’ve ever been to Florence, you have probably seen his work.  In 2006, he painted Partenze, a mural that spans the walls of the train station (more of his work can be seen in various squares and buildings throughout the city):

Partenze

Regardless of what and where Talani is painting, it lures you in with its strong sense of color and thick brush strokes.  A real pleasure to examine up close.

Partenze Rosse

If you like what you see, check out Talani’s website here!

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