Stefano Faravelli

January 8, 2014 § 1 Comment

As a last-minute addition to the concluding days of my winter break, I went back down to Ancona (there’s a long story that goes along with this decision, which I hope to develop and shed light to in the next couple of posts).  While there, I went to visit my favorite bookowner in my favorite art bookstore.  Not only did I learn that I sold a couple of artworks that I left hanging there a while back, but I found a new illustrated travel diary upon the shelves.

And not just any travel diary.  Something good, really good.

Let me introduce you to Stefano Faravelli, a talented Italian artist, traveler, and teacher.  Born in Torino in 1959, he studied Fine Arts at the University of Torino, and then worked as a painter, marionette maker, and stage designer at the Teatro del Sensibili.  Pursuing his childhood interest in nature and the world around him, he returned to school to take a degree in moral philosophy, focusing on the oriental world.

The combination of art and philosophy spurned him to take various long trips to lesser-explored areas of the world: Mail, China, Egypt, India.  And in each of these countries, he observed and he reflected.  And he took notes, and he learned, and he created a very enriching illustrated travel book for each nook of the world.

In other words, this man is living my ideal life.  I hope to follow in his footsteps one day in the near future (or, am I already?)

Here’s a couple of examples from each of his travel books (I still need to complete this collection… and my birthday is this week, ahem):

CHINA:

MALI:

StefanoFaravelliMali

INDIA:

EGYPT:

StefanoFaravelliEgypt

Not that these snapshots do any justice to all of the details and notes that appear on each page.  Between the musings and the high attention to detail and incorporated scraps of random things, these are very fun books to flip through.

To see more artwork and learn more, visit Faravelli’s webpage here!  It’s quite an impressive collection of art, whether you are looking for examples of illustrative pieces, sketches, fine art, or theater productions.

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